Newsletter July 2021

Announcement My new book Secrets and Lies: The Shocking Truth About Recent Aboriginal History, A Memoir, is available for pre-order on Amazon for the special price of 99c US as an ebook. It will be launched on 3 July and will stay at 99c for a few more days. The print book will be available shortly after. Here is the link – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B095SDW3LY

I would love some reviews on Amazon please and for you to share about it on social media. It has had a lot of pre-orders already and so has been no 1 new release in a lot of categories – Civil Law, Public Law, Constitutional Law Discrimination, International Treaties, Sociology of Race Relations, Civil Rights, Australian and NZ History, Australian and Oceanian Politics, Study and Teaching and Education Reference.

This review came in today from Self Publishing Review – This passionate and deeply researched book shines a light on what Aboriginal really means. The author’s unique style of gonzo journalism is fascinating, and illustrates the power of on-the-ground reporting. Despite it being a work of history, this story feels incredibly timely, given the ongoing political battles for First Nation rights in other parts of the globe. All told, Secrets and Lies is an eye-opening and fearless reflection on a vital topic.

Norman made a large hand for me to promote my book and I am standing with it in his art gallery.

BOOK OF THE MONTH

This recent book by NSW Senator Andrew Bragg may be a gamechanger for Liberal party attitudes to the Uluru Statement from the Heart and the possibility of the enshrinement of an Indigenous Voice in the Australian constitution. Here is and excerpt from his speech to the Sydney Institue.

Buraadja: The liberal case for national reconciliation
by Andrew Bragg

The title of this book is “tomorrow” in the Dhurga language of the Yuin people – Buraadja is about the type of country we want to be tomorrow.

The question is, why write a book on the history of liberalism and Indigenous affairs?

The answer is that the issues facing Indigenous people are serious and often intractable and there is a question mark over the nation whilstever we live with “the gap”.

I believe “the gap” is the modern consequence of the “Great Australian Silence” coined to describe the nation’s blind spot on Indigenous matters by anthropologist Bill Stanner in 1968.

As I said in my First Speech to the Senate, it is the nation’s unfinished business.

Put simply, Australia is a great country but it has not generally been a great country for Indigenous people.

What I wanted to do tonight was set out the key liberal arguments for delivering on the Uluru Statement from the Heart.

Before I do that, I must acknowledge the support of my colleagues for this project. It’s important that people know the Liberal Party is still the big tent. I have been encouraged even by people who don’t agree with this agenda to write.

The book has a generous foreword from the Prime Minister who said:

“… for over two centuries we have perpetuated and suffered from an ingrained way of thinking, and that is the belief we know better than our Indigenous peoples. We don’t. We also thought we understood the problems facing Indigenous Australians better than they did. We don’t.”

Prime Minister Morrison is developing a strong record on Indigenous affairs which builds upon Harold Holt’s and Malcolm Fraser’s significant record.

Innovation and leadership on Indigenous affairs has been a thread of Australian liberalism. It has always been there. Indeed, Billy Wentworth was effectively arguing for a voice to parliament in the 1960s.

His contemporaries like former Liberal Party director Tony Eggleton told me Wentworth influenced Harold Holt.

Harold Holt delivered the historic 1967 referendum to arm the national government with power to legislate for Indigenous people and to be included in the census.

Sadly too many of us remember him for his death, not for this achievement which his predecessor (and probably his successor) was not prepared to provide.

Had he not disappeared, I believe our collective memory would place the referendum at the top of the Holt recollection pile. Scant detail exists on Holt, he never wrote his memoirs and there is just one biography written by the brilliant Professor Tom Frame.

Malcolm Fraser delivered land rights laws which have led to the bulk of the Northern Territory now being under the control of the original owners.

The Fraser era was not an era of economic reform but it was impeccable on liberal values: a fair deal for Indigenous people and a strong humanitarian approach on Vietnam and South Africa.

The thread bloomed during this period. I interviewed all three Fraser Ministers for Aboriginal affairs – Ian Viner, Peter Baume and Fred Chaney. They all say that Fraser was instrumental in delivering land rights in the face of enormous opposition from the pastoral and mining sector and the Northern Territory Government.

Yet the nation remembers Gough Whitlam pouring the red dirt into the hands of Vincent Lingiari. We don’t give Fraser enough credit for forcing through the first Land Rights system in Australia.

The renowned Indigenous leader Charles Perkins described Malcolm Fraser as the best leader on Indigenous affairs in his lifetime. He said Fraser was “A1”.

Our Prime Minister Scott Morrison has presided over the radical overhaul of the closing the gap targets in collaboration with the Coalition of the Peaks. I am sure this will be a historically significant contribution.

The PM has ensured this critical reform agenda designed to boost education, health and economic participation is now “co-designed” with the appropriate input from the community itself.

He kept his commitment and funded the Voice co-design process which is underway through Ken Wyatt’s department. We are pursuing a Voice and we maintain our commitment to constitutional recognition.

He has also changed the anthem. Australia’s greatest sporting champion Cathy Freeman said:

“What a way to start the year!!! A phone call from our Prime Minister to say that we are “One and Free”! Thank you!!!”

The process of writing this book has also brought out comments from other leaders.

Indigenous Australians Minister Ken Wyatt said: “It is a contribution and a call to action for us all. And this is what we need to help not only progress on reconciliation but the debate around recognition..”

https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B094775SKN/

We commemorate NAIDOC Week or National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee from 4-11 July. It is fitting then to remember Aboriginal Christian William Cooper who convinced the churches in the 1930’s to commemorate Aboriginal Sunday. This became National Aborigines Day and has been transformed to NAIDOC so William Cooper is rightfully recognized as the Father of NAIDOC.

REVIEW FEATURE
Authors depend on reviews so I help other authors out with reviews when I can so I have decided to feature a few occasionally in case you’re interested. They are usually inexpensive and quick to read as ebooks on amazon.

Bold, Brave & Brilliant: 12 life lessons to cultivate mental strength and emotional resilience by Emma Loveday
While I didn’t agree with everything, there is a huge amount of useful information in this book from a writer who had social anxiety for 15 years and has successfully come out the other end to be able to help others. Each chapter starts with one of Emma’s colourful drawings which has helped her. Her key points are not to avoid pain in life which is inevitable and not to avoid failure because you can learn from your mistakes. She describes herself as the Queen of Trying. She talks about resilience and tolerating hardship, challenging your negative thoughts, not being a perfectionist, dealing with heartbreak, being vulnerable and adaptable and removing emotional roadblocks. She says everything worth fighting for involves a struggle and we need to prioritize so we are not overwhelmed. Much good advice. Reviewed by B Miller 17 May 21
https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B094XTXPHY/

Blame It On ‘Nam – How Education Became Indoctrination and what You can do about it: Become a critical thinking decision maker and advocate by Thomas Rowley, PhD
The author discusses the failure of the public education system in the USA to educate students in critical thinking and problem-solving skills. As an educator, he speaks from first-hand experience. He believes that the Vietnam War is one of the reasons for this. I won’t spoil your read by saying why. He is worried that many students and leaders in government, industry and education won’t listen to arguments that challenge their points of view. He discusses the effects of the pandemic and generational issues and is concerned re illiberalism. He recommends a plan of action and advocacy to deal with the issues raised. Reviewed by B Miller 20 June 21
https://www.amazon.com/Blame-Nam-Education-Indoctrination-critical-ebook/dp/B0971KXDJ3/

Farmers or Hunter-gatherers?

The Dark Emu Debate

Peter Sutton, Keryn Walshe

An authoritative study of pre-colonial Australia that dismantles and reframes popular narratives of First Nations land management and food production – Melbourne University Press.

My comment – Australians who have an eye on the media will know that Bruce Pascoe’s book Dark Emu that came out in 2014 has sold half a million copies, won him some literary prizes, led to a number of children’s books and study books for schools, led to a university professorship and generally made him famous. There has been little criticism until recently and now a new book by Sutton and Walshe has come out to specifically refute its argument that Australian Aborigines lived in villages of up to 1,000 people and were farmers not hunter-gatherers. There have also been doubts raised about his Aboriginality by others.

I read Dark Emu last year so have not refreshed myself on it. However, I thought at the time that the arguments were flimsy and stretched the point a lot. I have not read Sutton and Walshe’s book but know of Sutton’s good standing for his anthropological work at Aurukun in North Queensland.

Bruce Pascoe has apparently welcomed the debate according to Emeritus Professor Mark McKenna – https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/jun/25/bruce-pascoe-has-welcomed-the-dark-emu-debate-and-so-should-australia

Re Bruce Pascoe’s Aboriginality, just because someone is fair, does not mean they have no Aboriginal heritage. The long-accepted definition of an Aboriginal in Australia is someone who identifies as Aboriginal and is accepted as such by their community. So it is a personal plus community matter. I oppose any suggestion of having a national register of who is an Aboriginal. I don’t want to go back to the days of the late 1970’s in Queensland where the Bjelke-Petersen government wanted the government to define who is an Aboriginal.

Barbara Miller Book selection

Books on Yarrabah, Mapoon, William Cooper and de Quiros

The Dying Days of Segregation in Australia: Case Study Yarrabah – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GF864Q6/
White Woman Black Heart: Journey Home to Old Mapoon, A Memoir – https://www.amazon.com/dp-B07CCMV6CP/
White Australia Has A Black History: William Cooper and First Nations Peoples’ Political Activism – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07X1MYCDX/
William Cooper Gentle Warrior and The European Quest to Find Terra Australis Incognita:Quiros Torres and Janszoon – www.barbara-miller-books.com

Be blessed and happy reading!

Newsletter May 2021

Nearly there – new book.

I had planned on the title Battles with Bjelke and then Let My People Go, but ended up with Secrets and Lies. The subtitle is The Shocking Truth of Recent Aboriginal History, A Memoir. It is very revealing and no doubt you will be surprised many times. But also informed. It helps to understand how we got where we are today. But this is not first settlement history. It is a today book, or the last 50 years to May 2021 book. Don’t miss this exciting story! I plan to launch it at NAIDOC – National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Day Observance Committee in July 2021. Check my website for a discount for early buyers – www.barbara-miller-books.com

My book Secrets and Lies starts with the Aurukun people’s fight against mining on their land in 1975 and ends with the work for constitutional recognition including the Uluru Statement.

BOOK DESCRIPTION OF SECRETS AND LIES

Barbara Russell, a young woman from a white working-class family. A ruthless Premier Bjelke-Petersen enforcing legal discrimination. What secrets lie hidden? What lies are being told?

Barbara couldn’t stand by and watch the feud of the people with governments and miners strip Australian Aboriginal communities of all they held dear. Not if she could help.

But a white woman wasn’t always welcomed. A man fascinated with her passion might be her ticket to the action. Was she strong enough to make a difference for the people, resist the temptation of love, and stand up to her family too?

In this story of secrets, lies, ideological conflict and racial discrimination laws, Barbara teams up with Mick, an Aboriginal schoolteacher. They organise remote Australian Aboriginal people to fight Bjelke and the mining companies that encroach on their land. But Bjelke has a few tricks up his sleeve and will use all in his powers in this police state to stop them.

Can the church take on the state and win in this epic battle as the church stands with the Aboriginals to challenge racism? This historical memoir is another sizzling story in the First Nations True Stories series.

With the current debate in Australia of “Voice Treaty Truth” and the worldwide issue of Black Lives Matter, this book gives many key Aboriginal people a voice and reveals the shocking truth of the hidden history of 1975 to 2021 in a near-novel like manner. Every important historical event is covered. This is one of the social justice books that you will want on your shelf. The political activism examples are not those of keyboard warriors but those of a people who took to the trenches.

If you like fast-paced action, real-life heroes, and the window opened on another culture, this book is for you. If you like books with political intrigue that bring to life an interesting historical period, you’ll love Secrets and Lies.

REVIEW OF SECRETS AND LIES

A powerful, hard-hitting yarn, from the grassroots of Cape York community-life through to the necessary development of life-changing political activism on Cape York in the 1970s and 80s.

This is a story which needs to be told and has to be taught, with lessons to learn about what should be done, and how it should (and shouldn’t) be done.

These yarns are at the roots of what still happens today, in this day and age, making it an essential read for anyone who has ties or an interest in, not just in the Cape York landscape, but across all of Government/Aboriginal politics.

A well-written and fascinating contextual read for anyone with a passion for justice for Aboriginal people.

Christine Howes, FNQ correspondent for Koori Mail

 

AUSTRALIAN BOOK INDUSTRY OF THE YEAR AWARDS

Congratulations to the following winners of the ABIA Awards
ABIA BOOK OF THE YEAR
Phosphorescence: On awe, wonder and things that sustain you when the world goes dark, Julia Baird (HarperCollins Publishers, Fourth Estate)

Audio Book of the Year
Tell Me Why, Archie Roach; narrated by Archie Roach (Sound Kitchen, Simon & Schuster Australia, Simon & Schuster Australia)

Biography of the Year
The Happiest Man on Earth, Eddie Jaku (Pan Macmillan Australia, Macmillan Australia)

Also to other authors including Indigenous authors
In the children’s category, the Small Publishers’ Children’s Book of the Year was awarded to Gunai author Kirli Saunders for her book Bindi (illustrated by Dub Leffler). Rapper Adam Briggs, alongside co-authors Kate Moon and Rachael Sarra, won the Children’s Picture Book of the Year Award for Our Home, Our Heartbeat.

Books on Yarrabah, Mapoon, William Cooper and de Quiros

The Dying Days of Segregation in Australia: Case Study Yarrabahhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GF864Q6/
White Woman Black Heart: Journey Home to Old Mapoon, A Memoirhttps://www.amazon.com/dp-B07CCMV6CP/
William Cooper Gentle Warrior and The European Quest to Find Terra Australis Incognita:Quiros Torres and Janszoon 

Be blessed and happy reading!

William Cooper Anniversary Commemoration Sale

COMMEMORATION SALE COOPER & AAL BOOKS 

It is also the 10th anniversary of the honouring of William Cooper at Yad Vashem with a Chair of Resistance to the Holocaust being named after him and my husband Norman and I were privileged to be there for that event.

White Australia Has A Black History and Shattered Lives Broken Dreamsare on sale on Amazon as ebooks from December 5 at 8am PST to Dec 12 at 12am PST. It is a kindle countdown sale so the price starts at 99c USD if you get in quickly and progressively goes up.
Convert Pacific Standard Time (PST) to AEDT or your own time zone on https://www.worldtimebuddy.com/pst-to-aest-converter

White Australia Has A Black History: William Cooper and First Nations Peoples’ Political Activism – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07X1MYCDX/
Shattered Lives Broken Dreams: William Cooper and Australian Aborigines Protest Holocaust – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B084Q4SSTX/

You can also get the above paperback books from my website. You can get the original paperback of the William Cooper story “William Cooper Gentle Warrior: Standing Up for Australian Aborigines and Persecuted Jews” from my website with free shipping – https://www.barbara-miller-books.com

82nd Anniversary of Australian Aborigines’ League’s Kristallnacht Protest (Free event) 6 Dec 1.30 pm AEDT. Online event also.

The William Cooper Legacy Project invites you to a screening of our new video on the 82nd Anniversary of the very day that the Australian Aborigines’ League marched in protest to the German Consulate, back in 1938. 
 Arrive at 1.30pm for formalities preceding the World Premiere at 2pm  (AEDT) Screening
Sunday 6 December
 
at Temple Beth Israel Synagogue, 76-82 Alma Road, St Kilda

RSVP: by reply-email ASAP
TBI Melbourne » Growing Progressive JudaismContact Us – TBI Melbourne

All Covid-Safe protocols will be strictly in place – please be prepared to Sign-In, Sanitise, Wear Your Mask and be seated where directed.

BACKGROUND BRIEFING:
In preparation for this Sunday’s 2020 event, the German Government of today, on behalf of Chancellor Angela Merkel, were invited to reflect on the impact of the visit by William Cooper’s grandson, Uncle Boydie, to Berlin in 2017. Chancellor Merkel has now issued an unprecedented Apology for Germany’s 1938 actions… about what happened at the Melbourne Consulate on 6 December 1938.

Womenjika and Shalom 

On Sunday 6th December, will be the 82nd anniversary of an act of great moral leadership, where an Upstanding group of Aboriginal people took a stance on behalf of a distant population of persecuted Jews – that has since brought together 2 communities, who now Walk Together in solidarity evermore, connecting and healing.

And 10 years ago saw two seemingly-random and disparate events occur again on opposite sides of the world:
– In Jerusalem in December 2010, the most significant Holocaust Memorial in the world, Yad Vashem, hosted a group of 10 Aboriginal people along with then-Foreign Minister of Australia, the Hon Kevin Rudd, as he unveiled a Chair of Resistance and Resilience to the Holocaust, honouring an Australian from the Yorta Yorta “mob”, a man who lived many years at a place called Cummeragunja.

– And back in Australia in 2010, on Country, there was the Premiere of the Short Black Opera Company production of Pecan Summer, telling the story of the “Walk-Off” by a group of Aboriginal activists, from that very same Aboriginal Mission, Cummeragunja.

Both of these events have huge and fascinating back-stories – which each weave their way to a remarkable organisation called the Austalian Aborigines’ League, explored for us by educator and orator, Dr Lois Peeler AM.

This year, on 6 December 2020, the story will be told, including footage and photography from that (and other) trips to Israel, and to Berlin, Belgium and even Buckingham Palace.

Amongst other appropriate entertainment, you will get to witness the Prelude “Pecan Summer”, composed by Yorta Yorta’s Prof Deborah Cheetham and performed by the Melbourne Chamber Orchestra conducted under the Jewish community’s Dr David Kram.

Additional celebrity performances include Kate Ceberano, Lior and Paul Grabowsky, along with multilingual productions of cultural music like Ngarre Burra Ferra and the Partisan’s Song.

Get your tickets here > https://events.humanitix.com/william-cooper-legacy

Enquiries: WilliamCoopersLegacy@gmail.com

William Cooper Legacy Project

Lotjbadhan / B’yah’ad / Coming Together
 

Barbara Miller launching her 2 books on William Cooper the Sydney Jewish Museum Feb 2020. Barbara wrote “White Australia Has A Black History” and “Shattered Lives Broken Dreams”. The first focuses on William Cooper and the Australian Aborigines’ League’s Aboriginal activism and the second on their activism for Jewish people re their Kristallnacht protest at the German Consulate in Melbourne 6 Dec 1938.

White Woman Black Heart: Journey Home to Old Mapoon, A Memoir – https://www.amazon.com/dp-B07CCMV6CP/


The Dying Days of Segregation in Australia: Case Study Yarrabah – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GF864Q6/ 

Be blessed and happy reading!

 

Newsletter link
https://mailchi.mp/748cdecf5bfb/william-cooper-anniversary-commemoration-sale